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A Doorway is Not a Door

2016-06-07

Entranceways do more than let friends in or provide something to slam to the unwanted. When you began looking for a new door, you are planning a redesign of the foyer behind it, and light became a major issue.

The use of sidelights, the glass-dominated areas on each side of the doors, and a large glass panel in the door became ways of getting more light into the foyer. It made the project more costly, coming in at a little less than $5,000, but you may says you'v got what you are seeking.

"The entrance is important," says McCandless designer Cecelia Staniec, who worked with Krantz. "I always tell people to spend what they can without going over budget."

Going over budget would not be difficult to do. Simple doors can be purchased for a little less than $300, but easily top $1,000. Sidelight additions will make any project more expensive, obviously, and Carelle offers a warning that their inclusion sometimes is not eligible for the tax credit that expires at the end of the year. The credit is a maximum of $1,500 based on 30 percent of the project cost, but must be on products that are EnergyStar-rated in efficiency.

Hildebrand agrees, and says some triple-paned glass in entranceway construction would meet that demand. He and Drew both say, however, light always is a major issue in front-entrance jobs, so decisions often are based on the amount of glass.

Doors with large glass panels look good on homes that are of one exterior texture, Staniec says. But it is warned against their use in homes that mix elements of wood, siding and brick.

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