location, location, location! valley city, in dundas, is back!location, location, location! valley city, in dundas, is back!location, location, location! valley city, in dundas, is back!

by:Runcheng Chuangzhan     2019-10-01
Description: Centuryold re-
Transformation of industrial land. Photo: M. L. Holton.
Sometimes you stumble upon something so wonderful and so inspiring that you think about how you missed it before.
When I stumbled upon the former residence of Valley City 64 Hart Street in Dundas, I suddenly found this, when I was young, in the business of designing and manufacturing fine Canadian furniture, we always know that \"Valley city\" is there.
We heard they had church meetings and so on. (Ha!
Chuckle, chuckle, pews and panel ha! )-
We pride ourselves on our \"premium\" sophisticated custom wood furniture, but we barely know what they\'re really doing. . .
There will be more in a minute.
First of all, imagine my surprise.
To be honest, depressed)
In 2012, Gucheng manufacturing closed the door to carpentry.
A rival champion fell.
What a loss to the community!
Recently, when I was roaming around Dundas, I decided to spontaneously enter the \"space\" of the former factory to see what old stories (if any) those old walls could tell ). (
Carpentry is a group of family members.
They often customize their environment to make their crafts
Make it more enjoyable. . . )
Fortunately, I won the first prize.
Enter a 70
I \'ve been seen by a 35-year veteran maintenance guy --
The person who immediately called Robert D.
Crockford, president of Valley, \"somewhere in the hotel \".
15 minutes later, Bob Crockford, an old and Crooked Man
The Gentleman of the school, appeared, brought me into his oak tree
There was no Sparta office.
He went on to give me the fascinating history of what happened on that site in the past 178.
He then took me on a quick sprint around the renovated 35,000-square-foot facility, highlighting past and present changes.
On the way, he told me that he still has 35,000 square feet of land to develop. -
Note: This is another 35,000 and plenty of \"open\" space.
An hour later, it is no exaggeration to say that the site is a long-brewing cultural gold mine --
With a fascinating past, with a thriving present, there is a great future if everything goes according to Bob.
It all started with a stream. . . . Caption: Multi-shots of power-
Produce Webster falls and Spencer Creek. Photo: M. L.
There is a story on HoltonEvery\'s website, and Bob is very good at telling.
In 1836, John Gartshore, a young Scottish engineer, built the first building here.
A recent immigrant, 26-year-old Gartshore, co-founded Gartshore foundry with another Dundas
Businessman based in John Bell Ewatt. \" . . . Seemingly dull. But wait . . .
\"Since EPUB has the water right of the Spencer River, the partners Gartshore has chosen are very savvy.
So they control the only source of electricity available in the valley --
The stream of the stream flows rapidly on Webster falls.
But they have their own problems.
\"A building on the property was washed away in the early spring flood, and on October 6, 1846 the whole building on Hart Street was burnt out by fire.
Fortunately, both sides decided to rebuild.
The original cornerstone is to re-
Was incorporated into the new office space. Caption: (Clockwise)
Century-old stone wall and wooden ceiling, elevator shaft, woodworking sign, wood sample
Carving in the office area, traces of raw water-
The wheel race from the Gartshore foundry is still visible on the \"old section\" of 64 Hatt Street. Photo: M. L.
HoltonBob continued: \"to 1850, Dundas was the capital of foundry and machine tools that was then known as Western Canada.
Gartshore runs one of the most famous innovative institutions of the time, producing machines for grain mills, producing marine engines for the fast-growing steamboat industry, and producing pumps for water plants
Hamilton water plant also installed an example. \" (
Sidebar: Among the many people trained at the Gartshore foundry, there are Robert mccini and John Bertram, who all continue to build John Bertram & Sons.
John Inglis, founder of Inglis washing machine, learned about his deal with Gartshore, and John mclarry also learned about him with Gartshore\'s second son)
\"After Gartshore left in 1860s, the company was run by a group of local businessmen (
According to the source you consulted, it can be Thomas Wilson or Dundas foundry. )
By the end of 1880s, the business was already in trouble.
Finally, Cocheran machine has made several attempts to revive, partner John D.
Pennington and Edgar Baker purchased the building and house in 1893.
It was almost empty at the time.
\"Some of the history of these two Hamilton entrepreneurs is relevant.
Bob continued: \"By the 1880s, Alexander Graham Bell had just invented a device called a phone.
Pennington and Baker recognized the potential of this new equipment and began manufacturing wooden cases for bell-mounted parts in 1884.
The company is located at 81 south of James Street, downtown Hamilton.
In the same year, the two partners introduced their second product line, the student desk, for the rapidly growing school system.
These desks feature special design features and quickly become the standard for most parts of Canada and the United States.
\"In the first decade, the business grew so fast that it needed a bigger place.
Pennington and the moving woodworking master boarded in 1893 in April.
Description: The website is connected to the railway and is manufactured for export-in-
Dundas goods are available throughout the young country.
The picture is about 1885, provided by Gucheng.
However, there is little information about the business over the next decade that suggests a huge change in their operations.
The school\'s desk \"line\" disappeared and was replaced by benches and other furniture from the church.
\"The significant changes in the company\'s product line, just over ten years after its establishment, may be due to differences between partners on what products to produce.
\"After 35 years of business, John D.
Pennington chose to retire in 1929.
His retirement coincided with the beginning of the Great Depression.
\"The company is no longer called Pennington and Baker, but the Valley City seating company.
His partner, Pennington, then handed the company to his two sons at the beginning of the worst decade of economic depression in world history.
By 1937, there was almost no construction.
The original Mountain Valley seat company went bankrupt in 1937.
\"During this period, Joseph M.
Pigott, head of Pigott Construction Company (of Hamilton)
, Determined that suppliers of value to the industry should not disappear.
Pigott Construction Company provided financial support to several local companies including Gucheng, which he awarded a big contract for the new St.
Thomas psychiatric hospital
He also borrowed money from Gucheng to finance manufacturing.
Alas, these are not very successful.
By 1941, Pigott had full control of the business.
He then persuaded Nelson Crockford, then 28, to take charge of the day-to-day management of the Valley City.
When Nelson was at the helm in March 1941, there were very few orders in Valley City, with 25 employees and little hope of survival --
In addition to the upcoming demands of World War II.
Otis finsham elevator in Hamilton began production of Boforsaircraft Gun.
They need sturdy wooden cases, each part and tool has outlets in shape so that each item can be found in the dark.
There are idle equipment in Gucheng.
An agreement was reached that the valley city soon became an important supplier of Canadian war efforts.
Nine years later, in 1950, the Pigott Construction company sold Gucheng directly to Nelson Crockford.
With the end of the war
Old Nelson knows new products must be found.
Driven by the post-war \"baby boom\", the school, university and hospital furniture markets offer the biggest growth opportunities.
In just five years, from 1959 to 1964, the factory size in the Valley City doubled, increasing the East Wing, the new office and the new shipping wing.
The total number of staff increased to 1968, an increase of 200.
\"But in the 1970s S, the Valley City succeeded in thriving the school and university markets for 20 years in severe recession.
The company had to diversify in order to survive again.
Innovative new laboratory products ,(
Such as McMaster sub-servo system)
It was developed.
Nelson R at 1978
Crockford retired.
Robert D, general manager of his son, took over. Crockford -a. k. a \'Bob\'.
Robert knows that the next real opportunity for the company is just south of the border.
The health care program in Boston and elsewhere was his first attempt, but in his early 80 s his focus shifted to high-quality laboratory furniture.
Gucheng is an early leader in providing \"viable solutions\" for fast-growing micro-enterprises
Laboratory of biological research
Description: Raconteur, a local historian and president of Gucheng today (
Sit on the Church of The Last Valley city. . . )Photo: M. L.
In the next 20 years, Gucheng consolidated its position in the laboratory furniture industry with the \"Who is who\" customer list of medical research institutions such as Yale, Harvard, Cornell, etc, university of Pennsylvania and University of Southern California.
\"During the peak hours, laboratory furniture accounted for 80% of the Valley City commercial, and special seating for churches, courts and theaters provided a balance.
More than 90% of Gucheng\'s output is sold south of the border. \" . . . .
As you know now, this is not the manufacturer of \"normal\" panels and pews. . . .
Perhaps, in part, Gucheng officially closed its doors as a \"manufacturing\" in 2012.
Description: Today\'s website.
Appearance of 64 Hart Street Dundas. Photo: M. L.
That was the case at the time, now. . .
Use it today.
With seven acres of major real estate in the heart of Dundas near Spencer Creek, Bob Crockford and his financial partners are slowly turning this former industrial base into an emerging innovation hub --slash -
Cultural Center-slash -
Possible apartment development on Creek.
His biggest tenant on the first floor is Valley Antiques.
There are local treasures and fascinating historical ornaments that you can\'t even imagine.
Newly renovated factory upstairsto-
The office now hosts 30 different tenants, including Harvest robotics, Wilderness Medical Association, and aquarium props.
Remember, this is only half the potential space.
Description: like this? Let Bob know. Photo: M. L.
HoltonIn during my facility trip I got the obvious impression that Bob was not a \"normal\" developer.
He is interested in having tenants or owners who actively contribute to the general well
Belonging to a larger community
So it\'s not surprising to learn that he has made room for Chambers --
The bike from Mike\'s charity came.
Dozens of volunteers assembled more than 400 bicycles in these \"free\" locations, which were provided by the Crockford family.
To be sure, the great ol\' building lady is not finished yet.
If there is a \"story\" of urban renewal and revival in the Greater Golden Horseshoe area, that\'s it.
For anyone with a strong preference for historical design, cultural roots and creative innovation, the Valley City has many unknown opportunities.
The Valley City is easily the winemaking area of Dundas, which is a very small range.
It only needs more courage and courage, as well as some capital for development. . . Check it out.
Gucheng opened. Again. Photo: M. L.
Title: Century-old re-
Transformation of industrial land. Photo: M. L. Holton.
Sometimes you stumble upon something so wonderful and so inspiring that you think about how you missed it before.
When I stumbled upon the former residence of Valley City 64 Hart Street in Dundas, I suddenly found this, when I was young, in the business of designing and manufacturing fine Canadian furniture, we always know that \"Valley city\" is there.
We heard they had church meetings and so on. (Ha!
Chuckle, chuckle, pews and panel ha! )-
We pride ourselves on our \"premium\" sophisticated custom wood furniture, but we barely know what they\'re really doing. . .
There will be more in a minute.
First of all, imagine my surprise.
To be honest, depressed)
In 2012, Gucheng manufacturing closed the door to carpentry.
A rival champion fell.
What a loss to the community!
Recently, when I was roaming around Dundas, I decided to spontaneously enter the \"space\" of the former factory to see what old stories (if any) those old walls could tell ). (
Carpentry is a group of family members.
They often customize their environment to make their crafts
Make it more enjoyable. . . )
Fortunately, I won the first prize.
Enter a 70
I \'ve been seen by a 35-year veteran maintenance guy --
The person who immediately called Robert D.
Crockford, president of Valley, \"somewhere in the hotel \".
15 minutes later, Bob Crockford, an old and Crooked Man
The Gentleman of the school, appeared, brought me into his oak tree
There was no Sparta office.
He went on to give me the fascinating history of what happened on that site in the past 178.
He then took me on a quick sprint around the renovated 35,000-square-foot facility, highlighting past and present changes.
On the way, he told me that he still has 35,000 square feet of land to develop. -
Note: This is another 35,000 and plenty of \"open\" space.
An hour later, it is no exaggeration to say that the site is a long-brewing cultural gold mine --
With a fascinating past, with a thriving present, there is a great future if everything goes according to Bob.
It all started with a stream. . . . Caption: Multi-shots of power-
Produce Webster falls and Spencer Creek. Photo: M. L.
There is a story on HoltonEvery\'s website, and Bob is very good at telling.
In 1836, John Gartshore, a young Scottish engineer, built the first building here.
A recent immigrant, 26-year-old Gartshore, co-founded Gartshore foundry with another Dundas
Businessman based in John Bell Ewatt. \" . . . Seemingly dull. But wait . . .
\"Since EPUB has the water right of the Spencer River, the partners Gartshore has chosen are very savvy.
So they control the only source of electricity available in the valley --
The stream of the stream flows rapidly on Webster falls.
But they have their own problems.
\"A building on the property was washed away in the early spring flood, and on October 6, 1846 the whole building on Hart Street was burnt out by fire.
Fortunately, both sides decided to rebuild.
The original cornerstone is to re-
Was incorporated into the new office space. Caption: (Clockwise)
Century-old stone wall and wooden ceiling, elevator shaft, woodworking sign, wood sample
Carving in the office area, traces of raw water-
The wheel race from the Gartshore foundry is still visible on the \"old section\" of 64 Hatt Street. Photo: M. L.
HoltonBob continued: \"to 1850, Dundas was the capital of foundry and machine tools that was then known as Western Canada.
Gartshore runs one of the most famous innovative institutions of the time, producing machines for grain mills, producing marine engines for the fast-growing steamboat industry, and producing pumps for water plants
Hamilton water plant also installed an example. \" (
Sidebar: Among the many people trained at the Gartshore foundry, there are Robert mccini and John Bertram, who all continue to build John Bertram & Sons.
John Inglis, founder of Inglis washing machine, learned about his deal with Gartshore, and John mclarry also learned about him with Gartshore\'s second son)
\"After Gartshore left in 1860s, the company was run by a group of local businessmen (
According to the source you consulted, it can be Thomas Wilson or Dundas foundry. )
By the end of 1880s, the business was already in trouble.
Finally, Cocheran machine has made several attempts to revive, partner John D.
Pennington and Edgar Baker purchased the building and house in 1893.
It was almost empty at the time.
\"Some of the history of these two Hamilton entrepreneurs is relevant.
Bob continued: \"By the 1880s, Alexander Graham Bell had just invented a device called a phone.
Pennington and Baker recognized the potential of this new equipment and began manufacturing wooden cases for bell-mounted parts in 1884.
The company is located at 81 south of James Street, downtown Hamilton.
In the same year, the two partners introduced their second product line, the student desk, for the rapidly growing school system.
These desks feature special design features and quickly become the standard for most parts of Canada and the United States.
\"In the first decade, the business grew so fast that it needed a bigger place.
Pennington and the moving woodworking master boarded in 1893 in April.
Description: The website is connected to the railway and is manufactured for export-in-
Dundas goods are available throughout the young country.
The picture is about 1885, provided by Gucheng.
However, there is little information about the business over the next decade that suggests a huge change in their operations.
The school\'s desk \"line\" disappeared and was replaced by benches and other furniture from the church.
\"The significant changes in the company\'s product line, just over ten years after its establishment, may be due to differences between partners on what products to produce.
\"After 35 years of business, John D.
Pennington chose to retire in 1929.
His retirement coincided with the beginning of the Great Depression.
\"The company is no longer called Pennington and Baker, but the Valley City seating company.
His partner, Pennington, then handed the company to his two sons at the beginning of the worst decade of economic depression in world history.
By 1937, there was almost no construction.
The original Mountain Valley seat company went bankrupt in 1937.
\"During this period, Joseph M.
Pigott, head of Pigott Construction Company (of Hamilton)
, Determined that suppliers of value to the industry should not disappear.
Pigott Construction Company provided financial support to several local companies including Gucheng, which he awarded a big contract for the new St.
Thomas psychiatric hospital
He also borrowed money from Gucheng to finance manufacturing.
Alas, these are not very successful.
By 1941, Pigott had full control of the business.
He then persuaded Nelson Crockford, then 28, to take charge of the day-to-day management of the Valley City.
When Nelson was at the helm in March 1941, there were very few orders in Valley City, with 25 employees and little hope of survival --
In addition to the upcoming demands of World War II.
Otis finsham elevator in Hamilton began production of Boforsaircraft Gun.
They need sturdy wooden cases, each part and tool has outlets in shape so that each item can be found in the dark.
There are idle equipment in Gucheng.
An agreement was reached that the valley city soon became an important supplier of Canadian war efforts.
Nine years later, in 1950, the Pigott Construction company sold Gucheng directly to Nelson Crockford.
With the end of the war
Old Nelson knows new products must be found.
Driven by the post-war \"baby boom\", the school, university and hospital furniture markets offer the biggest growth opportunities.
In just five years, from 1959 to 1964, the factory size in the Valley City doubled, increasing the East Wing, the new office and the new shipping wing.
The total number of staff increased to 1968, an increase of 200.
\"But in the 1970s S, the Valley City succeeded in thriving the school and university markets for 20 years in severe recession.
The company had to diversify in order to survive again.
Innovative new laboratory products ,(
Such as McMaster sub-servo system)
It was developed.
Nelson R at 1978
Crockford retired.
Robert D, general manager of his son, took over. Crockford -a. k. a \'Bob\'.
Robert knows that the next real opportunity for the company is just south of the border.
The health care program in Boston and elsewhere was his first attempt, but in his early 80 s his focus shifted to high-quality laboratory furniture.
Gucheng is an early leader in providing \"viable solutions\" for fast-growing micro-enterprises
Laboratory of biological research
Description: Raconteur, a local historian and president of Gucheng today (
Sit on the Church of The Last Valley city. . . )Photo: M. L.
In the next 20 years, Gucheng consolidated its position in the laboratory furniture industry with the \"Who is who\" customer list of medical research institutions such as Yale, Harvard, Cornell, etc, university of Pennsylvania and University of Southern California.
\"During the peak hours, laboratory furniture accounted for 80% of the Valley City commercial, and special seating for churches, courts and theaters provided a balance.
More than 90% of Gucheng\'s output is sold south of the border. \" . . . .
As you know now, this is not the manufacturer of \"normal\" panels and pews. . . .
Perhaps, in part, Gucheng officially closed its doors as a \"manufacturing\" in 2012.
Description: Today\'s website.
Appearance of 64 Hart Street Dundas. Photo: M. L.
That was the case at the time, now. . .
Use it today.
With seven acres of major real estate in the heart of Dundas near Spencer Creek, Bob Crockford and his financial partners are slowly turning this former industrial base into an emerging innovation hub --slash -
Cultural Center-slash -
Possible apartment development on Creek.
His biggest tenant on the first floor is Valley Antiques.
There are local treasures and fascinating historical ornaments that you can\'t even imagine.
Newly renovated factory upstairsto-
The office now hosts 30 different tenants, including Harvest robotics, Wilderness Medical Association, and aquarium props.
Remember, this is only half the potential space.
Description: like this? Let Bob know. Photo: M. L.
HoltonIn during my facility trip I got the obvious impression that Bob was not a \"normal\" developer.
He is interested in having tenants or owners who actively contribute to the general well
Belonging to a larger community
So it\'s not surprising to learn that he has made room for Chambers --
The bike from Mike\'s charity came.
Dozens of volunteers assembled more than 400 bicycles in these \"free\" locations, which were provided by the Crockford family.
To be sure, the great ol\' building lady is not finished yet.
If there is a \"story\" of urban renewal and revival in the Greater Golden Horseshoe area, that\'s it.
For anyone with a strong preference for historical design, cultural roots and creative innovation, the Valley City has many unknown opportunities.
The Valley City is easily the winemaking area of Dundas, which is a very small range.
It only needs more courage and courage, as well as some capital for development. . . Check it out.
Gucheng opened. Again. Photo: M. L.
Title: Century-old re-
Transformation of industrial land. Photo: M. L. Holton.
Sometimes you stumble upon something so wonderful and so inspiring that you think about how you missed it before.
When I stumbled upon the former residence of Valley City 64 Hart Street in Dundas, I suddenly found this, when I was young, in the business of designing and manufacturing fine Canadian furniture, we always know that \"Valley city\" is there.
We heard they had church meetings and so on. (Ha!
Chuckle, chuckle, pews and panel ha! )-
We pride ourselves on our \"premium\" sophisticated custom wood furniture, but we barely know what they\'re really doing. . .
There will be more in a minute.
First of all, imagine my surprise.
To be honest, depressed)
In 2012, Gucheng manufacturing closed the door to carpentry.
A rival champion fell.
What a loss to the community!
Recently, when I was roaming around Dundas, I decided to spontaneously enter the \"space\" of the former factory to see what old stories (if any) those old walls could tell ). (
Carpentry is a group of family members.
They often customize their environment to make their crafts
Make it more enjoyable. . . )
Fortunately, I won the first prize.
Enter a 70
I \'ve been seen by a 35-year veteran maintenance guy --
The person who immediately called Robert D.
Crockford, president of Valley, \"somewhere in the hotel \".
15 minutes later, Bob Crockford, an old and Crooked Man
The Gentleman of the school, appeared, brought me into his oak tree
There was no Sparta office.
He went on to give me the fascinating history of what happened on that site in the past 178.
He then took me on a quick sprint around the renovated 35,000-square-foot facility, highlighting past and present changes.
On the way, he told me that he still has 35,000 square feet of land to develop. -
Note: This is another 35,000 and plenty of \"open\" space.
An hour later, it is no exaggeration to say that the site is a long-brewing cultural gold mine --
With a fascinating past, with a thriving present, there is a great future if everything goes according to Bob.
It all started with a stream. . . . Caption: Multi-shots of power-
Produce Webster falls and Spencer Creek. Photo: M. L.
There is a story on HoltonEvery\'s website, and Bob is very good at telling.
In 1836, John Gartshore, a young Scottish engineer, built the first building here.
A recent immigrant, 26-year-old Gartshore, co-founded Gartshore foundry with another Dundas
Businessman based in John Bell Ewatt. \" . . . Seemingly dull. But wait . . .
\"Since EPUB has the water right of the Spencer River, the partners Gartshore has chosen are very savvy.
So they control the only source of electricity available in the valley --
The stream of the stream flows rapidly on Webster falls.
But they have their own problems.
\"A building on the property was washed away in the early spring flood, and on October 6, 1846 the whole building on Hart Street was burnt out by fire.
Fortunately, both sides decided to rebuild.
The original cornerstone is to re-
Was incorporated into the new office space. Caption: (Clockwise)
Century-old stone wall and wooden ceiling, elevator shaft, woodworking sign, wood sample
Carving in the office area, traces of raw water-
The wheel race from the Gartshore foundry is still visible on the \"old section\" of 64 Hatt Street. Photo: M. L.
HoltonBob continued: \"to 1850, Dundas was the capital of foundry and machine tools that was then known as Western Canada.
Gartshore runs one of the most famous innovative institutions of the time, producing machines for grain mills, producing marine engines for the fast-growing steamboat industry, and producing pumps for water plants
Hamilton water plant also installed an example. \" (
Sidebar: Among the many people trained at the Gartshore foundry, there are Robert mccini and John Bertram, who all continue to build John Bertram & Sons.
John Inglis, founder of Inglis washing machine, learned about his deal with Gartshore, and John mclarry also learned about him with Gartshore\'s second son)
\"After Gartshore left in 1860s, the company was run by a group of local businessmen (
According to the source you consulted, it can be Thomas Wilson or Dundas foundry. )
By the end of 1880s, the business was already in trouble.
Finally, Cocheran machine has made several attempts to revive, partner John D.
Pennington and Edgar Baker purchased the building and house in 1893.
It was almost empty at the time.
\"Some of the history of these two Hamilton entrepreneurs is relevant.
Bob continued: \"By the 1880s, Alexander Graham Bell had just invented a device called a phone.
Pennington and Baker recognized the potential of this new equipment and began manufacturing wooden cases for bell-mounted parts in 1884.
The company is located at 81 south of James Street, downtown Hamilton.
In the same year, the two partners introduced their second product line, the student desk, for the rapidly growing school system.
These desks feature special design features and quickly become the standard for most parts of Canada and the United States.
\"In the first decade, the business grew so fast that it needed a bigger place.
Pennington and the moving woodworking master boarded in 1893 in April.
Description: The website is connected to the railway and is manufactured for export-in-
Dundas goods are available throughout the young country.
The picture is about 1885, provided by Gucheng.
However, there is little information about the business over the next decade that suggests a huge change in their operations.
The school\'s desk \"line\" disappeared and was replaced by benches and other furniture from the church.
\"The significant changes in the company\'s product line, just over ten years after its establishment, may be due to differences between partners on what products to produce.
\"After 35 years of business, John D.
Pennington chose to retire in 1929.
His retirement coincided with the beginning of the Great Depression.
\"The company is no longer called Pennington and Baker, but the Valley City seating company.
His partner, Pennington, then handed the company to his two sons at the beginning of the worst decade of economic depression in world history.
By 1937, there was almost no construction.
The original Mountain Valley seat company went bankrupt in 1937.
\"During this period, Joseph M.
Pigott, head of Pigott Construction Company (of Hamilton)
, Determined that suppliers of value to the industry should not disappear.
Pigott Construction Company provided financial support to several local companies including Gucheng, which he awarded a big contract for the new St.
Thomas psychiatric hospital
He also borrowed money from Gucheng to finance manufacturing.
Alas, these are not very successful.
By 1941, Pigott had full control of the business.
He then persuaded Nelson Crockford, then 28, to take charge of the day-to-day management of the Valley City.
When Nelson was at the helm in March 1941, there were very few orders in Valley City, with 25 employees and little hope of survival --
In addition to the upcoming demands of World War II.
Otis finsham elevator in Hamilton began production of Boforsaircraft Gun.
They need sturdy wooden cases, each part and tool has outlets in shape so that each item can be found in the dark.
There are idle equipment in Gucheng.
An agreement was reached that the valley city soon became an important supplier of Canadian war efforts.
Nine years later, in 1950, the Pigott Construction company sold Gucheng directly to Nelson Crockford.
With the end of the war
Old Nelson knows new products must be found.
Driven by the post-war \"baby boom\", the school, university and hospital furniture markets offer the biggest growth opportunities.
In just five years, from 1959 to 1964, the factory size in the Valley City doubled, increasing the East Wing, the new office and the new shipping wing.
The total number of staff increased to 1968, an increase of 200.
\"But in the 1970s S, the Valley City succeeded in thriving the school and university markets for 20 years in severe recession.
The company had to diversify in order to survive again.
Innovative new laboratory products ,(
Such as McMaster sub-servo system)
It was developed.
Nelson R at 1978
Crockford retired.
Robert D, general manager of his son, took over. Crockford -a. k. a \'Bob\'.
Robert knows that the next real opportunity for the company is just south of the border.
The health care program in Boston and elsewhere was his first attempt, but in his early 80 s his focus shifted to high-quality laboratory furniture.
Gucheng is an early leader in providing \"viable solutions\" for fast-growing micro-enterprises
Laboratory of biological research
Description: Raconteur, a local historian and president of Gucheng today (
Sit on the Church of The Last Valley city. . . )Photo: M. L.
In the next 20 years, Gucheng consolidated its position in the laboratory furniture industry with the \"Who is who\" customer list of medical research institutions such as Yale, Harvard, Cornell, etc, university of Pennsylvania and University of Southern California.
\"During the peak hours, laboratory furniture accounted for 80% of the Valley City commercial, and special seating for churches, courts and theaters provided a balance.
More than 90% of Gucheng\'s output is sold south of the border. \" . . . .
As you know now, this is not the manufacturer of \"normal\" panels and pews. . . .
Perhaps, in part, Gucheng officially closed its doors as a \"manufacturing\" in 2012.
Description: Today\'s website.
Appearance of 64 Hart Street Dundas. Photo: M. L.
That was the case at the time, now. . .
Use it today.
With seven acres of major real estate in the heart of Dundas near Spencer Creek, Bob Crockford and his financial partners are slowly turning this former industrial base into an emerging innovation hub --slash -
Cultural Center-slash -
Possible apartment development on Creek.
His biggest tenant on the first floor is Valley Antiques.
There are local treasures and fascinating historical ornaments that you can\'t even imagine.
Newly renovated factory upstairsto-
The office now hosts 30 different tenants, including Harvest robotics, Wilderness Medical Association, and aquarium props.
Remember, this is only half the potential space.
Description: like this? Let Bob know. Photo: M. L.
HoltonIn during my facility trip I got the obvious impression that Bob was not a \"normal\" developer.
He is interested in having tenants or owners who actively contribute to the general well
Belonging to a larger community
So it\'s not surprising to learn that he has made room for Chambers --
The bike from Mike\'s charity came.
Dozens of volunteers assembled more than 400 bicycles in these \"free\" locations, which were provided by the Crockford family.
To be sure, the great ol\' building lady is not finished yet.
If there is a \"story\" of urban renewal and revival in the Greater Golden Horseshoe area, that\'s it.
For anyone with a strong preference for historical design, cultural roots and creative innovation, the Valley City has many unknown opportunities.
The Valley City is easily the winemaking area of Dundas, which is a very small range.
It only needs more courage and courage, as well as some capital for development. . . Check it out.
Gucheng opened. Again. Photo: M. L.
Custom message
Chat Online 编辑模式下无法使用
Chat Online inputting...